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Maximus powers was such a craven and pathetic alter ego, won't you agree. A smarmy black white supremacist, so nauseating. Remember when you use to dickride churchill the bulldog faced unrepentant colonialists and black hater, that surely will go down the annals of ignominy.

 

I agree with your sentiment on hollywood and black actors by the way

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<cite>
said:</cite>

Maximus powers was such a craven and pathetic alter ego, won't you agree. A smarmy black white supremacist, so nauseating. Remember when you use to dickride churchill the bulldog faced unrepentant colonialists and black hater, that surely will go down the annals of ignominy.

 

lol. what can i say about you?

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i've been writing my Somaliland Memoirs. I've been told its a useful coping strategy for those afflicted with Reverse Culture Shock. another one to add to my long list of abbreviated conditions. im now OCD, NDP, Bi-polar, ADHD and now RCS. lol.

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Reverse culture shock: What, when, and how to cope

 

Moving home isn't always easy – many who repatriate feel different and utterly out of touch. This article explains what happens when culture shock is reversed, what to expect, and how to cope with its effects.

 

Just like expatriation, repatriation has its psychological phases that are unexpected and daunting. Most notably, encountering reverse culture shock when returning home is a surprising situation that's overlooked by both expats returning and their businesses calling to come home.

 

Like culture shock, reverse culture shock has a number of stages; imagine this to be a U-shape curve. At first, you may be excited to return home – seeing friends and family members, wearing the rest of your wardrobe, and eating at your favourite restaurants.

 

This initial euphoria eventually wears off, and that's when you find yourself feeling out of place in your own culture. This is the experience of reverse culture shock; it's the bottom of the curve and often the roughest part.

 

The good news is, although it may take time, you will begin a gradual adjustment back towards feeling comfortable with where and whom you are.

 

How reverse culture shock happens

 

“Reverse culture shock is experienced when returning to a place that one expects to be home but actually is no longer, is far more subtle, and therefore, more difficult to manage than outbound shock precisely because it is unexpected and unanticipated,” says Dean Foster, founder and president of DFA Intercultural Global Solutions, a firm that specialises in intercultural training and coaching worldwide.

 

Foster explains that expats learn over their time in a host country “...to behave and think like the locals, to greater or lesser degrees, while on international assignment.”

 

“By the time most traditional international assignments come to an end several years may have passed, providing the international assignee a significant amount of time to learn new patterns of behavior and thought necessary to fit into their host country.”

 

Foster points out that expats returning home are “shocked into the realisation that they have in fact changed substantially, usually when they encounter their home culture upon repatriating. Both they and their home culture have changed, and this is often the first time that expats have had the opportunity to experience any of these changes.”

 

What is reverse culture shock?

 

As strange as it sounds, expats become less and less familiar with their home stomping grounds. Returning brings a blanket of fog on perception, like an audience member walking around in a setting that’s familiar but still unreal.

 

Robin Pascoe, author of Homeward Bound, writes: “Re-entry shock is when you feel like you are wearing contact lenses in the wrong eyes. Everything looks almost right.”

 

Simply put, being an expat is such a lengthy and deep international experience it brings about great professional and personal changes. Old norms and values from your home country are viewed from a fresh perspective, and expats and their families see things in a new light; something like Dorothy going from black and white to Technicolor.

 

In addition, expats can begin to feel frustrated or confused when their close friends and family are anything but curious and intrigued about their experience. After all, the expat was gone to a foreign land for years, with sights, sounds and smells exotic and new.

 

Expats returning home can expect their top re-entry challenges being:

 

Boredom

No one wants to listen

You can’t explain

Reverse homesickness

Relationships have changed

People see 'wrong' changes

People misunderstand you

Feelings of alienation

Inability to apply new knowledge and skills

Loss/compartmentalisation of experience

(According to Dr. Bruce La Brack from the School of International Studies at University of the Pacific.)

 

How to deal with reverse shock

 

Share your experience with others

Although you might feel like no one wants to listen, there will be close ones who will support you with open ears and honest interest.

 

Start a blog, contact friends you made as an expat, or write articles – find new ways to incorporate your urge to share stories with an audience who will listen intently.

 

Maintain your style and stay international

Things might be different, people (including yourself) might have changed, but this doesn’t mean a 'repat' should give up character and interest learned from abroad just to fit in. Maintain your lifestyle, from the food you ate abroad to the nature of your evolving personality.

 

“Remember that being flexible and expecting the unexpected helped you get through the difficult times abroad. The same attitude can help you back home,” says the Office of International Studies at Northeastern University.

 

“Reverse culture shock is a transition, and an important learning experience. Use this time to rebuild relationships, interests, and your new worldly self.”

 

Keeping an international perspective is a special skill not to take for granted or put away. Read international magazines and foreign newspapers, or access news from your host country via websites and forums.

 

Ask for training

From an occupational point of view, to help expats have a successful repatriation Foster recommends training courses not just for the employee but the entire family that is returning.

 

“It needs to involve the HR [human resources] department at least six months prior to the return, so that the company can ensure a position for the repats that value their new skills. Repatriation training helps the entire family adjust to the fact that they have all changed significantly while on international assignment,” says Foster.

 

“Training will assess and value those changes, and see the ways their home country has changed while they were abroad.”

 

In the end, the transition requires patience and even more of an open mind than before. Careful preparation will ease the bumps experienced on the ride home for the entire family. Brace yourself for the shock and enjoy the unique thrills of seeing your home from this different and, in a sense 'far out', perspective.

 

---

http://www.expatica.com/uk/moving-to/Moving-home-Reverse-culture-shock_104957.html

---

 

interesting article on RCS.

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somalia-attack-AFP.jpg

 

AUN to the 25+ dead and the countless more injured on a beach. Somali life is so worthless. Somalia should be ashamed of itself.

 

the shame we are.

 

#25IsNotJustANumber

 

 

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huge bombing campaign by Kenyan Defense Forces in Gedo region. they've been bombing the poor nomads and their livestock since Friday according to the news. so far up to 50 people have been killed in retaliation to the recent Bantu massacre.

 

why isnt this reported?

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Nothing speaks more profoundly to the crisis of character than the phrase, ‘I identify as…’. In the past, individuals were. ‘I am a builder.’ ‘I am a mother.’ ‘I am a Jew.’ There was a confidence, a certainty, to their sense of identity, and to their declaration of it. ‘I am.’ Today, individuals identify as something. ‘I identify as working class.’ ‘I identify as non-binary.’ Or, in the notorious case of Rachel Dolezal, the American white woman who effectively blacked-up as she rose up the ranks of the NAACP, ‘I identify as black’. The rise of the i-word in our definition of ourselves, the ascendancy of what is called ‘self-identification’, is one of the most notable developments of the 21st century so far. It speaks to a shift from being to passing through; from a clear sense of presence in the world to a feeling of transience; from identities that were rooted to identities that are tentative, insecure, questionable.

 

continue reading here: http://www.spiked-online.com/spiked-review/article/the-crisis-of-character

 

really interesting read.

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OMG!! i had the weirdest dream. wait for this......TRUE STORY.

 

i WON the Nobel Peace price. i was shocked in being nominated and eventually clinching the price. the nominees were all very successful.

 

....but as usual, there was some controversy surrounding my success and some folks were claiming i wasn't worthy because i apparently rigged the process. it was at this time, the dream ended.

 

they sabotaged me.

 

LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL

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ive been tasked with setting up a Kulmiye Party branch here in Atlanta, Georgia. there's a few positions up for grabs if anyone fancies working on the committee.

 

- head of garabka haweenka

- head of garabka dhalinyarada

- head of fundraising.

 

let me know. thanks.

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Tallaabo   

<cite>
said:</cite>

OMG!! i had the weirdest dream. wait for this......TRUE STORY.

 

i WON the
Nobel Peace price
. i was shocked in being nominated and eventually clinching the price. the nominees were all very successful.

 

....but as usual, there was some controversy surrounding my success and some folks were claiming i wasn't worthy because i apparently rigged the process. it was at this time, the dream ended.

 

they sabotaged me.

 

LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL

Who were the other successful nominees? Holac? Xabad? Che?

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<cite>
said:</cite>

Reverse culture shock: What, when, and how to cope

 

Moving home isn't always easy – many who repatriate feel different and utterly out of touch. This article explains what happens when culture shock is reversed, what to expect, and how to cope with its effects.

 

Just like expatriation, repatriation has its psychological phases that are unexpected and daunting. Most notably, encountering reverse culture shock when returning home is a surprising situation that's overlooked by both expats returning and their businesses calling to come home.

 

Like culture shock, reverse culture shock has a number of stages; imagine this to be a U-shape curve. At first, you may be excited to return home – seeing friends and family members, wearing the rest of your wardrobe, and eating at your favourite restaurants.

 

This initial euphoria eventually wears off, and that's when you find yourself feeling out of place in your own culture. This is the experience of reverse culture shock; it's the bottom of the curve and often the roughest part.

 

The good news is, although it may take time, you will begin a gradual adjustment back towards feeling comfortable with where and whom you are.

 

How reverse culture shock happens

 

“Reverse culture shock is experienced when returning to a place that one expects to be home but actually is no longer, is far more subtle, and therefore, more difficult to manage than outbound shock precisely because it is unexpected and unanticipated,” says Dean Foster, founder and president of DFA Intercultural Global Solutions, a firm that specialises in intercultural training and coaching worldwide.

 

Foster explains that expats learn over their time in a host country “...to behave and think like the locals, to greater or lesser degrees, while on international assignment.”

 

“By the time most traditional international assignments come to an end several years may have passed, providing the international assignee a significant amount of time to learn new patterns of behavior and thought necessary to fit into their host country.”

 

Foster points out that expats returning home are “shocked into the realisation that they have in fact changed substantially, usually when they encounter their home culture upon repatriating. Both they and their home culture have changed, and this is often the first time that expats have had the opportunity to experience any of these changes.”

 

What is reverse culture shock?

 

As strange as it sounds, expats become less and less familiar with their home stomping grounds. Returning brings a blanket of fog on perception, like an audience member walking around in a setting that’s familiar but still unreal.

 

Robin Pascoe, author of Homeward Bound, writes: “Re-entry shock is when you feel like you are wearing contact lenses in the wrong eyes. Everything looks almost right.”

 

Simply put, being an expat is such a lengthy and deep international experience it brings about great professional and personal changes. Old norms and values from your home country are viewed from a fresh perspective, and expats and their families see things in a new light; something like Dorothy going from black and white to Technicolor.

 

In addition, expats can begin to feel frustrated or confused when their close friends and family are anything but curious and intrigued about their experience. After all, the expat was gone to a foreign land for years, with sights, sounds and smells exotic and new.

 

Expats returning home can expect their top re-entry challenges being:

 

Boredom

No one wants to listen

You can’t explain

Reverse homesickness

Relationships have changed

People see 'wrong' changes

People misunderstand you

Feelings of alienation

Inability to apply new knowledge and skills

Loss/compartmentalisation of experience

(According to Dr. Bruce La Brack from the School of International Studies at University of the Pacific.)

 

How to deal with reverse shock

 

Share your experience with others

Although you might feel like no one wants to listen, there will be close ones who will support you with open ears and honest interest.

 

Start a blog, contact friends you made as an expat, or write articles – find new ways to incorporate your urge to share stories with an audience who will listen intently.

 

Maintain your style and stay international

Things might be different, people (including yourself) might have changed, but this doesn’t mean a 'repat' should give up character and interest learned from abroad just to fit in. Maintain your lifestyle, from the food you ate abroad to the nature of your evolving personality.

 

“Remember that being flexible and expecting the unexpected helped you get through the difficult times abroad. The same attitude can help you back home,” says the Office of International Studies at Northeastern University.

 

“Reverse culture shock is a transition, and an important learning experience. Use this time to rebuild relationships, interests, and your new worldly self.”

 

Keeping an international perspective is a special skill not to take for granted or put away. Read international magazines and foreign newspapers, or access news from your host country via websites and forums.

 

Ask for training

From an occupational point of view, to help expats have a successful repatriation Foster recommends training courses not just for the employee but the entire family that is returning.

 

“It needs to involve the HR [human resources] department at least six months prior to the return, so that the company can ensure a position for the repats that value their new skills. Repatriation training helps the entire family adjust to the fact that they have all changed significantly while on international assignment,” says Foster.

 

“Training will assess and value those changes, and see the ways their home country has changed while they were abroad.”

 

In the end, the transition requires patience and even more of an open mind than before. Careful preparation will ease the bumps experienced on the ride home for the entire family. Brace yourself for the shock and enjoy the unique thrills of seeing your home from this different and, in a sense 'far out', perspective.

 

---

---

 

interesting article on RCS.

 

A good piece, will be sharing it further. Thanks Alpha.

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