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Ibtisam

Meet the Somalis - The illustrated stories of Somalis in seven cities in Europe

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Ibtisam   

I am not sure who is behind these illustrations but my heart-ached as I read through these- Not only does it only speaks volume about Somali experiences, but also depicts the reality many Somalis have been through and still going through everywhere. To battle general life issues, carry all the scars and emotional baggage of troubles and conflicts, yet burden by immigrant tag while they try to get a leg up in life and restart.

 

I find all the stories so so incredibly sad! :( but Saafi story :(

 

www.opensocietyfoundations.org/multimedia/meet-the-somalis#saafi

 

Probably not healthy to read them all in one go

 

"Meet the Somalis is a collection of 14 illustrated stories depicting the real life experiences of Somalis in seven cities in Europe: Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Leicester, London, Malmo, and Oslo. The stories allow readers a unique insight into what everyday life is like as a Somali in Europe. Meet the Somalis is based on the firsthand testimonies of Somalis in Europe interviewed during six months in 2013.

 

The Somali community in Europe is a vibrant, diverse minority group, including people of Somali origin born in Europe, Somali refugees and asylum seekers, and Somalis who have migrated from one country in Europe to another. There are no accurate figures for the number of Somalis in Europe, but on the whole they are among one of the largest minority groups.

 

The illustrated stories focus on challenges faced by Somalis in their respective cities in Europe and issues raised in the Somalis in European Cities research, including education, housing, the media, employment, political participation, and identity.

 

Meet the Somalis depict experiences many of us will never know, like fleeing a warzone with your children or, worse, leaving your loved ones behind. But more often, these stories portray the values shared amongst many of us, like the importance of family, well-being, and identity in an ever-changing world.

 

Stay tuned: Meet the Somalis will be translated into Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, and Somali."

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Ibtisam   

Your most welcome.

 

I think the guilt of being the "one that got away" is the hardest burden to deal with! and the resentment felt by those who got left behind fuels their sense of entitlement. A nasty cycle.

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Apophis   

Absolute nonsense that those with security, health care and welfare have the gall to somehow portray themselves as suffering. The self indulgence never bloody ends.

 

Let them change places then they'll know what real pain is like.

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Apophis   

And let's remember, before the weaklings here are swayed by the crocodile tears, that those who made it to the west were, for the most part, the upper and middle classes, who had it good before the war and still do in their new countries.

 

No poor Somali is able to pay 10k to get to Europe. Keep that in mind.

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Hawdian   

who's behind this cartoon -like stories. And who can verify if these people are real or it's some authors imagination about Somali in qurbaha. No ,hmmm I'm

Just gonna pas on all the emotional beenta.:cool:

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Maqane   

Well, i think Apo & Hawdian raised a valid point here with regards to these illustrated stories. Some of these stories could be real balse intooda badan waa 'Calaacal' . When Somalis (my people) the ones from rich families make to Europe, most of them must go through asylum seeking process, during the process they 're interviewed the situations back home (what made them flew and what they went through), most of them make up fake stories, this is called "Calaacal". The powerful the Calaacal the faster the process. It's not because they're liars but because they 're forced to do this otherwise won't be given a residence.

 

 

If i go on-topic, i find Saafi's story very emotional indeed. Thanks Ibti for sharing. :(

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Ibtisam   

Haye?

 

Meesha qasaab majiro- if you dont like- dont read.

 

That aside as for are the stories true- whose stories are they etc: I dont know who is behind the project so I cant comment on that, but I dont think that it is important at all. I know enough Somali refugee circumstances, I know my own and my families journey to identify and have empathy with the collective experience. It does not matter what the individual journey is and how few clever ones made up stories.

 

Also Maqane Asylum has increasingly become difficult, but there was a time, that conditions in "Somalia" was bad everyone qualified.

 

Focus on the themes- rather than who, what, and how- what do you want? their picture and clan so we can verify it with their elders. :D

 

Anigu I read it as the collective experience of refugees- context specific to Somalis.

 

Also, if it does not move you then that is fine- Maybe you guys were privileged enough not to face some of the same issues or know any who did.

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Ibtisam   

There are criticisms of this project- For example

 

"This piece by OSF depicts Somalis with non-human, unrecognizable and unidentifiable figures. Even the cartoons do not look anything like Somalis. I'll take Amin Amir's sketches any day over this. Therefore, it behooves me to say that this piece dehumanizes us, and you most certainly do not depict "The Largest Minority Group" in Europe as cartoons, rather through actual photography and videography. We are now reduced to cartoons in the acts of seemingly advocating for us but actually perpetuating stereotypes by having hyperlinks under this project to CNN and BCC about recent bombings in Kenya and Somalia. Don't buy into this." Somali brother.

 

But I think he takes issues with the method- cartoons rather than message- and although I agree with him, I can understand that some of the stories are too depressing and sad to associate with real faces and individuals (and then it is a specific story of a specific person, rather an a generic story which could be part of the overall experience) Also which migrant would agree to putting their picture up?

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Tallaabo   

Apophis;985725 wrote:
Absolute nonsense that those with security, health care and welfare have the gall to somehow portray themselves as suffering. The self indulgence never bloody ends.

 

Let them change places then they'll know what real pain is like.

Apophis;985726 wrote:
And let's remember, before the weaklings here are swayed by the crocodile tears, that those who made it to the west were, for the most part, the upper and middle classes, who had it good before the war and still do in their new countries.

 

No poor Somali is able to pay 10k to get to Europe. Keep that in mind.

You seem harsh but I agree with what you said:D

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Apophis   

*Ibtisam;985758 wrote:
There are criticisms of this project- For example

 

"This piece by OSF depicts Somalis with non-human, unrecognizable and unidentifiable figures. Even the cartoons do not look anything like Somalis. I'll take Amin Amir's sketches any day over this. Therefore, it behooves me to say that this piece dehumanizes us, and you most certainly do not depict "The Largest Minority Group" in Europe as cartoons, rather through actual photography and videography. We are now reduced to cartoons in the acts of seemingly advocating for us but actually perpetuating stereotypes by having hyperlinks under this project to CNN and BCC about recent bombings in Kenya and Somalia. Don't buy into this." Somali brother.

 

But I think he takes issues with the method- cartoons rather than message- and although I agree with him, I can understand that some of the stories are too depressing and sad to associate with real faces and individuals (and then it is a specific story of a specific person, rather an a generic story which could be part of the overall experience) Also which migrant would agree to putting their picture up?

 

I think it's quiet telling that you selected a comment which criticises a group representing (a section) of a particular clan. Your clannism is subtle but there. Fortunately, I do not believe clannishness is a bad thing and thus take no issue. ;)

 

As you were.

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Ibtisam   

Apophis;985802 wrote:
I think it's quiet telling that you selected a comment which criticises a group representing (a section) of a particular clan. Your clannism is subtle but there. Fortunately, I do not believe clannishness is a bad thing and thus take no issue.
;)

 

As you were.

Huh??? What clan? :confused:

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