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The Somali pluralization seems complex, any tips on how I can learn it? 

For example how can I pluralize: Aabo, hooyo, abooto, moos, yaanyo.  

How can I say: "Accent" and "What time is it?" 

Does "Labo" have a more consistent word that means  20? Like "laba" has "labaatan". 

Labootan? 😂

How do you say "what time is it?", "how much is it", "eagle", and "vulture"? (I googled image searched "Gorgor" and it brings up "eagles" and the link below says "Gorgor" is "vulture". So I'm writing off as a mistake in the link, or a possible dialectal difference.)

Could someone explain what's with these accented letters "dál", "mídowga Afriká"? - Somali Noun Morphophonology

WWW.LING.UPENN.EDU

(I occasionally see it in writings. I'm just starting to learn the Somali alphabets, and seeing things like that confuse me.)

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15 hours ago, Come Learn Somali said:

The Somali pluralization seems complex, any tips on how I can learn it? 

For example how can I pluralize: Aabo, hooyo, abooto, moos, yaanyo.  

How can I say: "Accent" and "What time is it?" 

Does "Labo" have a more consistent word that means  20? Like "laba" has "labaatan". 

Labootan? 😂

How do you say "what time is it?", "how much is it", "eagle", and "vulture"? (I googled image searched "Gorgor" and it brings up "eagles" and the link below says "Gorgor" is "vulture". So I'm writing off as a mistake in the link, or a possible dialectal difference.)

Could someone explain what's with these accented letters "dál", "mídowga Afriká"? - Somali Noun Morphophonology

WWW.LING.UPENN.EDU

(I occasionally see it in writings. I'm just starting to learn the Somali alphabets, and seeing things like that confuse me.)

Soomaali alphabet does not have accented letters. Dal is dal and Afrika is Afrika. The accented words were made by that website itself to help their non-Soomaali readers, I guess.

Labaatan is for 20 correct. Labalaab is for double for another example.

What time is it? = Meeqo saac waaye for Koonfur or imisa saac for Waqooyi folks.

Gorgor the bird is eagle in English. Vulture is baqalyo, I think.

Other wild bird names:

Hawk = dafe

Falcon = galeyr

Owl = guumeys

Ostrich = goronyo

Crow = tuke (The Soomaali word for 'pray' (tuko) comes from this bird's name. It appears the ancient Soomaalis in a way had a high regard to this bird as were other ancient people.)

Also the sound this crow bird makes, waaq, entered the ancient Soomaali lexicon for God's name. Ancient Soomaalis called God 'waaq.' There are many Soomaali words this word has as a suffix or prefix. Words like barwaaqo (God's place/blessed by God), ceelwaaq (God's well), jidwaaq (God's path), garwaaq (God's judgement) and waaqdhowr (protected by God).

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Tallaabo   
7 hours ago, Miskiin-Macruuf-Aqiyaar said:

Crow = tuke (The Soomaali word for 'pray' (tuko) comes from this bird's name. It appears the ancient Soomaalis in a way had a high regard to this bird as were other ancient people.)

Also the sound this crow bird makes, waaq, entered the ancient Soomaali lexicon for God's name. Ancient Soomaalis called God 'waaq.' There are many Soomaali words this word has as a suffix or prefix. Words like barwaaqo (God's place/blessed by God), ceelwaaq (God's well), jidwaaq (God's path), garwaaq (God's judgement) and waaqdhowr (protected by God).

Caabudwaaq probably was a place of pilgrimage for the ancient Somalis. I like the fact that our people were always monotheists and as a result when Islam came to us we adopted it so easily - Waaq was now called Allah and He had a message for us. 

The crow is given a good reputation in Qur'an as the bird sent by Allah to show Adam's criminal son who murdered his righteous brother out of jealousy how to bury his dead brother's corpse. 

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17 hours ago, Miskiin-Macruuf-Aqiyaar said:

Soomaali alphabet does not have accented letters. Dal is dal and Afrika is Afrika. The accented words were made by that website itself to help their non-Soomaali readers, I guess.

Labaatan is for 20 correct. Labalaab is for double for another example.

What time is it? = Meeqo saac waaye for Koonfur or imisa saac for Waqooyi folks.

Gorgor the bird is eagle in English. Vulture is baqalyo, I think.

Other wild bird names:

Hawk = dafe

Falcon = galeyr

Owl = guumeys

Ostrich = goronyo

Crow = tuke (The Soomaali word for 'pray' (tuko) comes from this bird's name. It appears the ancient Soomaalis in a way had a high regard to this bird as were other ancient people.)

Also the sound this crow bird makes, waaq, entered the ancient Soomaali lexicon for God's name. Ancient Soomaalis called God 'waaq.' There are many Soomaali words this word has as a suffix or prefix. Words like barwaaqo (God's place/blessed by God), ceelwaaq (God's well), jidwaaq (God's path), garwaaq (God's judgement) and waaqdhowr (protected by God).

iyo @Tallaabo 

Aad baa u/uu(?) mahadsantahiin. Waxyalo badan baan* juwaabtiina ka bartay. "Baambow*" lafa cuno magaciisana waan raadinaye, lakiin hadan helay. 😂 

"Daa'uus" quruxlayna hadii saafka ay(?) ku jirin hadan ku daraa. Ingiriiska magacyo kala dugan buu/bu(?) u kaasaaya ninka iyo naagta shimbirkan "Daa'uus" la dhaho. Ama loo yaakhno(thanks Google translate) yaqaano. Marka, qofktii* kaasaaso(?) in af-Soomaliga na siidaas(?)/saas camal logu kaasayo oo nosheegiikarto ha/haa no(?) sheegto. 

 

(My Somali spelling is a work in early progress, and Google translate (not only is it not trustworthy with sentences, though it also) does not write in my Somali dialect. So a lot of the words depends on me trying to sound them out in order to write them.) 

 

 

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17 hours ago, Miskiin-Macruuf-Aqiyaar said:

Soomaali alphabet does not have accented letters. Dal is dal and Afrika is Afrika. The accented words were made by that website itself to help their non-Soomaali readers, I guess.

Labaatan is for 20 correct. Labalaab is for double for another example.

What time is it? = Meeqo saac waaye for Koonfur or imisa saac for Waqooyi folks.

Gorgor the bird is eagle in English. Vulture is baqalyo, I think.

Other wild bird names:

Hawk = dafe

Falcon = galeyr

Owl = guumeys

Ostrich = goronyo

Crow = tuke (The Soomaali word for 'pray' (tuko) comes from this bird's name. It appears the ancient Soomaalis in a way had a high regard to this bird as were other ancient people.)

Also the sound this crow bird makes, waaq, entered the ancient Soomaali lexicon for God's name. Ancient Soomaalis called God 'waaq.' There are many Soomaali words this word has as a suffix or prefix. Words like barwaaqo (God's place/blessed by God), ceelwaaq (God's well), jidwaaq (God's path), garwaaq (God's judgement) and waaqdhowr (protected by God).

"Dafe" I think that sounds like the Somali word for "snatcher", I guess it goes from flying to snatching ?? = baahalo*(?) hence the name. 

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6 hours ago, Come Learn Somali said:

"Dafe" I think that sounds like the Somali word for "snatcher", I guess it goes from flying to snatching ?? = baahalo*(?) hence the name. 

Yes, dafe also means snatcher, from the daf word, meaning snatch. It is also the the name for hawk. You would know why we call hawks snatchers by watching them when they hunt for a prey.

Bahal is any wild animal, insect, reptile, et cetera.

Daa'uus the bird is called peacock in English. It is borrowed from Carabi language.

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16 hours ago, Tallaabo said:

Caabudwaaq probably was a place of pilgrimage for the ancient Somalis. I like the fact that our people were always monotheists and as a result when Islam came to us we adopted it so easily - Waaq was now called Allah and He had a message for us. 

The crow is given a good reputation in Qur'an as the bird sent by Allah to show Adam's criminal son who murdered his righteous brother out of jealousy how to bury his dead brother's corpse. 

The word Waqooyi, too. Originally it was Waaqooyi. I guess ancient Soomaalis might have faced that northern direction to pray. Perhaps.

Soomaalis also had a few other names for God, two of them being Eebbe and Wacad.

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7 hours ago, Miskiin-Macruuf-Aqiyaar said:

Yes, dafe also means snatcher, from the daf word, meaning snatch. It is also the the name for hawk. You would know why we call hawks snatchers by watching them when they hunt for a prey.

Bahal is any wild animal, insect, reptile, et cetera.

Daa'uus the bird is called peacock in English. It is borrowed from Carabi language.

I thought that was the case about dafe. Thanks I haven't really been able to put a meaning to "bahal" for a while. :)


Actually I google searched now to be more certain about the English name for "Daa'uus", and even I was a bit off about it in that I only knew the English male, and female names for them, respectively: peacocks, and peahens. Now I learned that together (male, and female) they are called "peafowl". 

"Technically, only males are peacocks. Females are peahens, and together, they are called peafowl." "Peafowl" is the general name for the family of birds." -https://www.google.com/amp/s/api.nationalgeographic.com/distribution/public/amp/animals/birds/group/peacocks

Though commonly people call them both "peacocks" in English. 

"The young of a peacock and a peahen are called peachicks." - https://animals.mom.me/difference-between-peacocks-peahens-7416.html

 

 

So I wondered if there was such distinction in Somali/Arabic too.  Sidda af-Soomaaliga, qaar ahaan lajada Banadiri/Koonfureed(?) uu u istaacmalo "dooro, diiq," iyo "gigi" (ma la dhaha?) caamal. Respectively "hen(?)*", "rooster" and "chicks". big edit: Now I'm unsure whether Somali means "hen", or "chicken", when it says "Dooro". 

WWW.EURO-POULTRY.COM

The words “chicken” and “hen” are often used arbitrarily. But what’s the...

 

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On 5/27/2020 at 7:40 AM, Miskiin-Macruuf-Aqiyaar said:

Soomaali alphabet does not have accented letters. Dal is dal and Afrika is Afrika. The accented words were made by that website itself to help their non-Soomaali readers, I guess.

Labaatan is for 20 correct. Labalaab is for double for another example.

What time is it? = Meeqo saac waaye for Koonfur or imisa saac for Waqooyi folks.

Gorgor the bird is eagle in English. Vulture is baqalyo, I think.

Other wild bird names:

Hawk = dafe

Falcon = galeyr

Owl = guumeys

Ostrich = goronyo

Crow = tuke (The Soomaali word for 'pray' (tuko) comes from this bird's name. It appears the ancient Soomaalis in a way had a high regard to this bird as were other ancient people.)

Also the sound this crow bird makes, waaq, entered the ancient Soomaali lexicon for God's name. Ancient Soomaalis called God 'waaq.' There are many Soomaali words this word has as a suffix or prefix. Words like barwaaqo (God's place/blessed by God), ceelwaaq (God's well), jidwaaq (God's path), garwaaq (God's judgement) and waaqdhowr (protected by God).

 

Barowo hal, labo, seddex.

 

23 hours ago, Tallaabo said:

Caabudwaaq probably was a place of pilgrimage for the ancient Somalis. I like the fact that our people were always monotheists and as a result when Islam came to us we adopted it so easily - Waaq was now called Allah and He had a message for us. 

The crow is given a good reputation in Qur'an as the bird sent by Allah to show Adam's criminal son who murdered his righteous brother out of jealousy how to bury his dead brother's corpse. 

I just learned that I can respond at once to posts by different users here. 😂

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