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Ms MoOns

Out of curiousity

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Apophis;895980 wrote:
Is that like the Dutch version of Santa Claus? And I'm assuming the minstrels are like Santa's helpers-the elves??

Yes it is Apophis.

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In the Netherlands, everyone is quite aware of the Christmas character known as Black Pete. He's a little African slave who helps out Santa Claus. According to the Dutch tradition, Black Peter is responsible for carrying a book full of the names of naughty children, along with a rod and a sack to take the bad children away. He also scatters candy for children. Since the character's creation in the 1840s, the Dutch have defended it. They even dress up publicly in blackface, and claim that Black Pete is only dark from coming down the chimney -- but he doesn't wash clean.

Yet recently, Black Peter is causing more anger and controversy among the Dutch for the stereotypes associated with the Christmas character.

In fact, they became so mad that organizers of New Westminster's Dutch Sinterklaas celebrations in Canada have pulled Black Peter from their traditional parade after complaints that the black-faced helper carried racist undertones. Members of the African-Canadian community complained that the character was offensive and outdated. It was the first time since 1985 that Black Peter will not accompany Sinterklaas as he heads to New Westminster Quay aboard a paddle wheeler boat, according to the Vancouver Sun. Bernard Piprah, who was an organizer of the annual Black History Month symposium at Douglas College, argued to the Vancouver Sun that the Black Peter character comes loaded with offensive, racist stereotypes: "[The character] is degrading, and it's racist, and it's incredibly outdated," Piprah said told the Vancouver Sun. "You can't erase that. You can go to your local library and read that this Black Peter was a slave. He beat children. He was dumb, and he spoke buffoonish Dutch. There are just so many insulting aspects to that character, and I can't believe they're celebrating it in New Westminster." Although many Dutch just want the tradition to stop, some would like to address the issue. In Holland, critics say that avoiding the racism implied in continuing the Black Peter tradition is a way of avoiding the thorny issue of immigration. "It's kind of something they should address, no matter what the culture, when an aspect of it is clearly offensive to a particular group," Piprah told the Vancouver News.

 

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http://www.thegrio.com/news/black-pe...ion-or-not.php

 

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interesting article.

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Ms MoOns   

Narniah;895784 wrote:
Hey Ms Moons, het gaat prima met mij sgat n met jouw?

Leuk om zo veel kaaskopen hier tegen te komen. Hey maakt mij zo blij!
:)

Thanks for this much needed thread, the dutch community here I must say are the brightest...:)MashaAllah.

I'm doing very well, lieverd. Alhamdulilah. Ik vind het ook grappig om hier opeens meer Nederlanders tegen te komen! Really nice!

 

Leuk ook om jou te leren kennen schat!

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Ms MoOns   

Bluelicious;895933 wrote:
Dank je, en het verschilt per persoon maar ik heb daar geen problemen mee. Tuurlijk mag je weten het is 23 al hoewel soms doe ik alsof ik ouder ben, denk dat het te maken heeft met het feit dat ik gewoon snel ouder wil worden. Ik vind het ouder worden iets moois het brengt wijsheid met zich mee maar je ziet ook veel dingen van het leven. H0e jong ben jij geworden?

Ik ben 22 geworden schat. En ben helemaal met je eens! Alhoewel ik jonger uitzie dan ik werkelijk ben, ik voel me toch wel altijd ouder dn ik echt ben. Haha, 3 verschillende leeftijden lijkt het wel. Ik heb niks tegen ouder worden. Forever young bestaat niet, en ik groei graag voortdurend.

 

Studeer je nog? :)

 

Wa 'alaykumu salaam

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Ms MoOns   

Chimera;895955 wrote:
Yep, best wel lang geleden, ik ben nog steeds in London, en jij Brum-town?

 

Ik was daar vorig jaar en zag veel oude shows, toen kreeg ik een beetje heimwee. Ik kijk geen tv in de UK mijn laptop is genoeg lol.

 

Avondvierdaagse was leuk, ik deet dat tussen de jaren 5 and 8 in een klein dorpje. Toen we naar een groote stad waren verhuisd vol met Turken and Marokkaanen, NIEMAND deet avondvierdaagse LOL.

Ja dude, nog steeds in Birmingham!

 

Waar woonde jij trouwens vroeger in Nederland? Ik heb een groot deel altijd in Brabant gewoond, Brabander for life haha.

 

I barely watch tv these days :( plus moet nodig een nieuwe laptop lol

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Apophis   

A question for Dutch speakers: how do you maintain a hold of the language after leaving the country? Do you practice? I ask because I used to be very fluent in Swahili but I have totally forgotten it because I never had the chance to us it in the UK.

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Ms MoOns   

OdaySomali;896379 wrote:
Gefeliciteerd Ms MoOns. En trouwens jouw Engels is erg goed voor iemand die hier alleen maar twee jaar is. Goed gedaan.

Dank je wel! Haha, in Nederland leer je Engels als een verplichte vak vanaf de middelbare school toch. Daar heb ik heel wat van opgestoken, plus had een persoonlijke ambitie voor de Engelse taal :)

 

You're not too bad yourself haha. H0e lang ben jij weg uit Nederland?

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Ms MoOns   

Apophis;896382 wrote:
A question for Dutch speakers: how do you maintain a hold of the language after leaving the country? Do you practice? I ask because I used to be very fluent in Swahili but I have totally forgotten it because I never had the chance to us it in the UK.

That's a very good question. Practice does make perfect. However, I haven't been away that long from Holland, so it's too soon for me to forget it that easily. I still speak Dutch with my siblings, my husband and email almost daily with close Dutch friends. I guess because of my regular use it's harder to forget lol - I must say though, it depends on age as well. Children tend to forget a language easier ones they stop using it. My little brother was 7 when we came to the UK, didn't know a word English and now he speaks English more fluently than Dutch. While older people tend hold on to a language a longer period of time, even without regular use.

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Apophis   

Ms MoOns;896386 wrote:
That's a very good question. Practice does make perfect. However, I haven't been away that long from Holland, so it's too soon for me to forget it that easily. I still speak Dutch with my siblings, my husband and email almost daily with close Dutch friends. I guess because of my regular use it's harder to forget lol - I must say though, it depends on age as well. Children tend to forget a language easier ones they stop using it. My little brother was 7 when we came to the UK, didn't know a word English and now he speaks English more fluently than Dutch.

Thanks for the answer :)

 

I think the key, as you've pointed out, is to have a group of people you can communicate the language with. When I came to the UK my first language was Swahili, now whenever I go back to Kenya people can't believe I can't speak the language anymore. Should have practiced :D

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