Oodweyne

Today Was The Day SNM was Created And The History of The Somali Peninsula Changed Forever.

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Oodweyne   

So the fiction our Galbeedi is peddling in here, just as our Suldaanka have noticed it, is that of saying that one morning from the blue a group of men working in professional middle-class jobs in Saudi-Arabia decided to stop everything they were doing there. And then took a plane to London, proceeded to gathered in Hotel conference room out there in London. And for good measure decided to form a "rebel insurgency movement" back in their home land?

Is that sum of the argument we have been "invited" to entertained in here? Poor lad. I see our friend, Mr Galbeedi, is still suffering from the "concussion" and from the "disorientation" he took it in seeing the comprehensive defeat of his precious unionist ideology within Somaliland. 

No, this was not the case. And it's far from the truth of the matter. And in fact one can say that by 1978 the situation of the northern region of the then Somali Republic was getting worse and getting ever more dire by the month. For I was there as a young primary school in Hargeisa. Furthermore, Gen. Barre's military dictatorship due to the defeat it had suffered in 1978 war against Ethiopia decided to concentrate his army heavy garrison in the north lest the folks there gets any idea about rebelling against his regime.

Moreover, by early 1980 the port of berberra was effectively closed for business. And the system of "franco-fluto" which was a "commercial method" in which most northern folks used it just to get their goods in and out from Berberra was dismantled. And for good measure everyone (from your rich livestock exporter to the average small businessmen) in the north of the country were told to go to Mogadishu's port, if they want to ply their "export-and-import-trade". And then, all of a sudden, the late Gen. Gani, was transferred in to the northern region by middle of that year of 1980, which was when real "shit" start happening on the ground in the north.

This is the background reality that actually made it easily for folks who formed the then SNM to established very speedily their movement. Given the fact that by 1981 everyone can see where things where going on the ground, particularly politically and in-terms of the oppressive agenda of Gen. Barre's iron-fisted occupying forces, which was commanded by his clannish cousin, namely, Gen. Gani.

Hence, leaving aside the fiction our Galbeedi tells himself in most night out there in Alberta of Canada, the things in the north of the country by 1981 wasn't a bed-of-roses (as it were). And in fact it was one hell of a garrison place, which actually was akin to what the Israel's occupying defense forces (i.e., IDF) do on a daily basis in places like the West Bank and in Gaza strip.

Whilst, of course, all sort of summary executions and collective punishments are naturally happening there on a daily basis, just as they used to happen in the northern region when Gen. Gani was running the show at the behest of his cousin, name Gen. Barre's dictatorship..

Now, of course it could be the case that, our Galbeedi, being a stoogely-minded sort of a fellow, may actually think that we never had it so good even in the midst of that dire situation that I have just described in here.

But then that essentially speaks "volume" about his view of what constitute of what any society should look forward to from their government rather than describing what was the actual reality of the northern region of the then Somali republic. And what they were experiencing at that time. Hence the less said about his "warped view" of reality that was actually there, the better we shall feel in the end, really.

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galbeedi   

Jeneral Gani was transferred  to Hargeisa in 1982, after Jeneral Can Jeex died of the Somali airplane crash of July 1981. 

By the time Gani arrived the insurgency had already begun. Prominent members from the north like Carte Qalib, Ismacil C. Abokor and others were arrested.

Other than Mogadishu were all foreign aid from the west is started coming , life on the countryside was tough, but there were no inflation, and in Marka, Kismaayo or Baidoa , you could survive with  10 Shillings a day. Definitely the storm of rebellion was gathering around, but like HAG community in Mogadishu, Jowhar and Hiiraan, life was not bad in Hargeisa. The Franco Fuluto you mentioned was in full force from late seventies to 1982.

After 1982, the government introduced "LC" were only licensed businessman could import things which created corrupt capitalism of the few. Until then, Berbera was booming. I witnessed big hotels with Telex numbers on Burco billboards managing the livestock trade to Berbera in the summer of 1981.

Our difference is that, you are talking how conditions changed after the formation of the rebel movements. Central Somali was ghost both in the cities and the countryside, and real started after you crossed from Garoowe to Burco. 

 What You might not like to mention is the Habro in Mogadishu and other places were always a close knit community who always worked for the interest of the tribe regardless of which government they were represented. Even Jaamac Mohamed Qalib who was the Somali police chief had admitted in his book how he was the messenger between the rebels and the Habro who were in the government.

 

Soomalida kale badankooda ayaa daacad iska ahaa maahine Wadanka mar hore ayaa lakala qaybsaday. 

The Habro community had worked so hard for the Kacaan and they wanted to replace Siyaad Barre . They wanted either to be the secretary general of " Xisbiga Hantiwadaaga Kacaaka Soomaaliyed" which elected siyaad Barre chairman in 1976. They wanted to sepretate the party leadership and the prseident like most communist countries. Since the Habro crushed the SSDF , they wanted to be rewarded, but siyaad refused and arrested those who brought the proposal.

 

As  Dr. Baadiyow said in conversation, the political war was among the Northern elite and southern politicians. When the elite fight among themselves for their own interest, they usually use the innocents public and we all lose. That is why people in Hargeisa were not ready for rebelion. THey were enjoying life, but certain leaders of the Somali defense ministry helped the rebels by making life of the people difficult in the middle of eighties. DEspite their military campaigns in mandera jail and other places, SNM was unable to force the people to accept violence and join the war.

It was the reckless policy of the state including using the prohibition of the Qat  to confiscate vehicles and harass people. 

Waxaad moodaysay in Jabhada iyo madaxda ciidanku wada Shaqaynayaan si shacaku ugu biiro kacdoonka. Waxuna mar hadduu kacdoon shacab noqdo meel laga soo qabto ma leh.

 

The crust of the matter is certain men from your community had organized the plot without knowing the high prices people pay for their rebellion. Allah is always just, but if the Somali government hadn't collapsed in Mogadishu, people and historians would have looked back how SNM was  not only reckless but also  suicidal in storming  the cities of Burco and Hargeisa with full of civilian population.  Even Siilaanyo himself said it was suicidal and abandoned the plan and resigned , Cigaal said, " Waa xasharaad dab ku daadanaya"

Ilaahay waa caadil in ay wax isbedelaan isagaa keenay, laakiin siyaasadiinu waxay ahayd mid keentay burbur balaadhan.

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Oodweyne   

Galbeedi,

Again, I hate to say this but what you wrote in here is a fiction from top to bottom.

First, Gen, Gani, was made the head of 26th division in Birjeex by late 1980. He was running the show by 1981. Second, the Franco-Fluto was dismantled by 1981. And by 1982, everything was confiscated that came to Berberra by the regime, particularly if the goods were "commercial imports" done by the businessmen from the Beshe-Dhexe's folks.

Thirdly, if Siyad barre was so innocent as you wants him to be (and are claiming in here) then no one would of have crossed the border to join the SNM forces. And as you may not know it but even the secondary school students in Hargeisa and Burco were streaming into the SNM's military camps in Ethiopia by the summer of 1981.

Moreover, what was happening in Mogadishu and who was working for Mr Barre had no even a "tangential relationship" with what his occupying army were doing to the folks there in the north. And it's this occupation with its curfew of 2:00 pm in the afternoon being in force in the north and no economical activities of any kind happening there by late 1981 was actually what allowed the SNM to thrived and recruit more forces from the northerners than they could actually do anything useful with it.

Furthermore, that some of the folks from Beshe-Dhexe were working in secret for the SNM is no great revelation. After all, unlike you, the Beshe-Dhexe, actually thought that the nation they created in 1960 in conjunction with their compatriots from Somalia, which became the Somali Republic, should have been better than what it become under Siyad barre's misrule. Or failing that, they were prepare to quit and form their own nation-state, which is what they have done it back in 1991 by the barrel of their gun (no less). Notwithstanding the lack of recognition of it. 

As for the SNM mission being a suicidal, I am sure that in your tranquil life of living in Mogadishu as university student you could be forgiven in viewing the matters that way. But, back in the northern region, the issue was that of putting up with the endless occupation of Mr Barre's brutalky-minded army, Or failing that then doing something about it. Which, mercifully, the then SNM forces and Col. Ahmed Mire in particularly were brave enough to do what they thought it was the only option open to them (and their folks) at that time.

Hence, despite the enormous sacrifices they made it along the way they have succeeded in destroying those Gen. Barre's occupying forces in their land.

And their enemies are as of now scattered across the seven seas holding vigil in a bone-crashing defeat, foaming-at-the-mouth endlessly, and praying ceaselessly for the destruction of those SNM folks who actually bested them in the eyes of the brutal judgement of history of the Somali peninsula.

As for those stooges of who were "dependent" on Mr Barre's atrocious dictatorship, well all one can say about them is that some of them have got it on with the "program" and joined Somaliland's political project. And others, like you and Suldaan Wabar (out there in Canada) are forever "nursing" their "political defeat" in their diaspora existence, I am afraid.

And finally, although I hate to quote Mr Winston Churchill in here, but he had it about right when he said that the only conduct worthy before the judgement of history that is open to any society is this. Which is: "In War: Resolution. In Defeat: Defiance. In Victory: Magnanimity. In Peace: Good Will".

And in that sense, in "war", we in Somaliland (or the then SNM forces at any rate) were "resolute". And if ever "defeat" was what we were "destined" to have tasted it at the hand of Gen. Barre's forces, then we would of been in "defiance" till the end of times. And in "victory", which was what we have celebrated back in 1991 we were "magnanimous" to all of our former enemies and their "stoogely-minded foot-soldiers", who "sided" with our enemies along the way. And of course since we are now in "peace" we are brimming with "good will" to all comers, indeed.

This is who we Somaliland really are. And to certain extend this is what the then SNM were about. And the rest you said in here, I am afraid, is your "spit-warmed-fiction" in which you peddle to yourself in most days. 

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Barwaaqo   
44 minutes ago, Oodweyne said:

And their enemies are as of now scattered across the seven seas holding vigil in a bone-crashing defeat, foaming-at-the-mouth endlessly, and praying ceaselessly for the destruction of those SNM folks who actually bested them in the eyes of the brutal judgement of history of the Somali peninsula.

😹😹😹

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Amigos   

At this juncture a particularly pertinent question is why exactly were Galbeedi's folk so happy to be mere lackeys of Afweyne till the bitter end? 

I can understand his kin supporting him out of sheer tribal loyalty, but why are some elements from Galbeedi's community such Afweyne extremists, to this day?

It is very clear now that he was not only a genocidal dictator, a terrible war commander (losing all engagements he involved the Somali people in), as well a failure of a governor managing the country (the Somali Republic under Afweyne lagged behind sub-saharan countries on most economic indicators). So why is it that this particular community chose to be his servants (willingly) and continue their lackey duties posthumously?

All Somali communities stood against Afweyne's rule, some got the memo before others, but in the end a majority decided that enough was enough. Only Afweyne's immediate kin, along with the Galbeedi's folk still push the kacaan cool-aid to this day. It is bizarre. 

I am guessing they really appreciated him naming their district in Woqooyi Galbeed a region called Awdal? I can not think of any other reasons why they would still support Afweyne to this day. 

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19 hours ago, galbeedi said:

A year or so ago when Farmaajo was elected, I said that the leader of the Somali nation must feel as the custodian of the horn of Africa. We own and inhabit the largest land mass and the most strategic land in the horn. The Somali leader must be the anchor of the Somali people from Jijiga to Djibouti, and Wajeer. I have no doubt that the future belong to us. When I say these pronouncements,  some of you might say that is the usual boating of Galbeedi, yet, I can sense our future.

I think history is going a different way. You might find in a decade that Jigjiga will be the most sought after Somali place more than Mogadishu. Somalis in every region or country are choosing to have peace in their territories and develop. What ever happens to existing countries or territories is not in the radar screen of any sane Somali right now.

And practically it cannot be. Any Somali who cannot maintain a village should not be thinking of a district. Ground up rather than top to bottom is the solution.

 

Foreign countries can only put you down if there is problems in the ground already. Foreigners can only take advantage, cannot create out of thin air. With your kind of outlook, it will not work. Enemy of my enemy is my friend works only if you are the driver, not the passenger.

Be it SNM, SSDF, USC...they are all Somali products. You also seem to have my friend, a completely not real appreciation that be it Kenya or Ethiopia have no interest what so ever in dismemberment of Somalia. It is not in their economic, geostrategic interest. The bottom line is Somaliland is more of a threat to Ethiopia than Somalia.

The easiest country to take over for Ethiopia was Djibouti, but even then Ethiopia cannot do that, and did not.

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Oodweyne   
18 hours ago, Amigos said:

All Somali communities stood against Afweyne's rule, some got the memo before others, but in the end a majority decided that enough was enough. Only Afweyne's immediate kin, along with the Galbeedi's folk still push the kacaan cool-aid to this day. It is bizarre. 

Lets wait with nothing less than a "baited breadth" as to what our Galbeedi will have to say to this rather pertinent and deeply "troubling" question that is in here.

Although, to be fair in here, it has to be said that the folks of Awdal region had already seen the "light" (at least most of them did it) judging by the "political talks" of this region which I heard it personally the last time I was there in mid-November of last year (2017).

But there is still a size-able intelligentsia of this community, who are mostly in the Diaspora, who actually will tell you (with straight face, no less) that Gen. Barre was the best thing that ever happened to the Somali race since "camel milk" was discovered in the Savannah wilderness of the Somali peninsula. And that is a bizarre proposition to say the least, indeed.  

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Holac   

Galbeedi has a lot of information the average person doesn't have. I am always intrigued and fascinated by how he can relate past events to present day struggle for Somali unity. I didn't know the first ideas of the SNM were hashed out in Saudi Arabia. 

Whatever the initial intention, in the end, the people of Somaliland suffered tremendous loss of life and the country was destroyed. If we didn't have a dictator willing to do anything under the sun to subjugate his people to stay in power, situation may have been different. Who is laughing now? I say the secessionists. They've practically achieved their goal. 

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Oodweyne   
2 hours ago, Holac said:

Galbeedi has a lot of information the average person doesn't have. I am always intrigued and fascinated by how he can relate past events to present day struggle for Somali unity. I didn't know the first ideas of the SNM were hashed out in Saudi Arabia. 

Holac,

Well I beg to differ with you in here. You see, our Galbeedi friend, could actually know the real deal of the SNM.

And he could easily find out the simple fact that is the folks who created the SNM were in Saudi-Arabia as a professional middle-class folks, who were working in their profession of being a manager, lawyer, civil-engineer, professor, accountant, and economist (just to give the list of the profession of the first six guys who created the SNM).

And he could easily furthermore find out that the reason they had to go to UK and created the SNM there, was because they were in Saudi-Arabia. And of course, the Kingdom was in "bed" politically with Gen. Barre's government and therefore they couldn't have build their rebel movement there.

In other words, unlike what Galbeedi is alleging in here, which is that Saudi-Arabia had a hand in the creation of the SNM, the basic truth of the then SNM is actually far from what he is alleging in here.

In particularly the basic truth was that of a group of men who realized that they couldn't make a "political move" in Saudi-Arabia, lest they found themselves on the first plane of being deported back to the "dark dungeons" of Gen. Barre's regime, and therefore they needed to go a "free" UK just to launch their political movement from there.

Consequently, our Galbeedi, is not actually engaging in a honest based (or a good-faith based) discussion in here. But rather he is essentially trying to grind his political axe at the expense of the basic truth he could easily find out if he only tries.

After all, despite everything else, he is still a Somalilander (or at any rate a Northerner) and by the looks of it he knows so many people from that section of the Somali peninsula.

And he could easily ask those Awdalites folks who were closest to the SNM's rebel movement, such as Mujaahid Cabdirahman Aw-Cali, particularly as to how the then SNM was formed by those folks who decided to leave Saudi-Arabia and go to UK when they wanted it to create their rebel movement.

But apparently, he would rather blind-side the folks in here of SOL, who knows no larger history of the then SNM, with his cobbled together fiction. Instead of at least trying to argue honestly of his case of disagreeing with whatever the SNM may have wrought it at the end of the day without deliberately "bastardizing" its amply told history. And that is my innate difficulty with him in here. 

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Oodweyne   

^^^^

Xaaji,

Thanks for bringing back up this thread (and its comment's posts) from last year. And, of course, I have almost forgotten that today is indeed the 6 of April, which is a historical day for us. Given that it was day the then SNM was created back in that year of 1981. I must say though that what a history they have left behind for us. Much of it to be eternally proud of it, to say nothing about all of us being grateful for that history.

However, re-reading this lengthy discussions that I had with our Mr Galbeedi, I am still struck by the sheer "falsification" in which he went out of his way to do in here. Particularly, when he argued that the founders of the then SNM were basically men on a mission from the Saudi Kingdom (KSA). And therefore they were acting as "biddable stooges" of others and for the Saudis's Sheikdom.

Which means, his argument actually amount to way of saying, that, these SNM's founders weren't men who were solely motivated on anything resembling that of a higher and a "nobler cause". But on the contrary, his argument was that they were driven with a lowly and the baser desire to solely and politically "serve" others. And, indeed, to do so at the expense of the well-being of their very own people back in the north of the then country.

Sometimes, it seems that our Galbeedi has the tendency to actually read history not the way it has basically have happened, But rather on the basis of what serves him right at that moment in so far as his "political agenda" is concern.

And that as many of you may not know it is actually call (at least in academic circles) as that of: "motivating reasoning". Which is a worse form of "intellectual misconduct" in which one could be liable to be accused of it in any public historical debate, where "granite facts" (pure and simple) are wholly sacrosanct.

But still all the same, one has to say that it's still the case that the history of SNM is written in gold ink. It's also secure in the bosom of every one who is grateful for the existence of the present-day Somaliland. And, to boot, our present-day children and their future children will be taught of it in their schools, from Primary level to secondary school level. And from Awdal region on one end to East Sanaag on the other end. As well as in all those regions in-between those two extremities will also get it in the full measure of it.

Hence, the fact that our very own Galbeedi of SOL may have an axe-to-grind against it, or may have a problem with it, really is so much of a water off a duck's back in the importance in which one should view of it. Or how much significant one should put a stock of his falsified and bogus concern, really.

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The SNM famous for introducing to the world the now populor Technico or local SNM lingua 'Dayacan' - A mostly Toyota pickup truck with its cabin removed and a heavy gun mounted in the back. In South Somalia they keep the cabin on.

The first such vehicle was introduced by the SNM and knicknamed as "Sahra Tuugo", it was based on a Mercedes truck body. The name came after it took part in many battles with Somalia Army in which it was able to bring back more armoury from looting military storage armoury caches. 

Dayacan (no love/tlc) kurta laga wada jaray, for easy accessibily. 

snm.jpg

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