Oodweyne

A Detailed Definition of High Culture versus Low-Culture in the Somali Context.

Recommended Posts

Oodweyne   

Hello Folks,

Here is a something the likes of Che and others of you who may not know any better should keep in mind. Specifically about the sort of the manifestation in which the very definition of "low-culture", which in turn is despoiling, raping, and indeed, "emptying-of-all-meanings", of the very essence of what "Somali High-Culture" at its "elan of excellence", is, would actually look like it. And in particularly if you put them in plain manifestation as this first video will indicate it to you.

Hence, if you were take as an "example" of the first video below, which is a song with its wretched "Niiko" (no less) that is call "Baydhabo Janaay", you may have a rough idea of what "low-culture" in the Somali context actually look like it.

For what we have in here is basically a vacuous, a merit-less, song. As well as it being a song that is essentially "assaulting-the-sense" as much it says nothing of a sophistication claim for itself, other than having the "baser acts" of two lady twerking their silly bottom-behinds. And doing it so. rhythmically, along with the music of the song. 

 

Moreover, in contrast, here below I give you the definition of "High-culture", expressed in "two literary songs". This manifestation of high culture must at the end of the day be a  highly-refined, at least in the Somali culture we are likely to be talking about in here. And by that I mean the depth of the meaning it's conveying, the seamless-ness of, both, the literal words that are being used to put matters across, and the "mental picture" those very words brings them to live in your mind must be of exceptional high order of things.

Furthermore, a "literary culture" of the kind our oral society actually excel at, is something that is about more than words. Be it poetry or be it songs. For at the heart of it, its what those words invoke in you as a spoken words, as much how they, subsequently, stir the imagination in the sense of "mental picture" those words creates for you. And at juncture, when you reach that state of "imaginative arousal" (in the cultural sense of that word) then you are almost there in-terms of the definition of whether it's "low-culture" or "high-culture" which you have at that precise moment in question in your hands.

Hence, that means the "spoken words" (or if they are not words, then the other cultural medium you are using to convey those cultural artifacts) are actually not meaningless, or should be meaningless. But they are "real force" that gets you to either a "high-culture" or to "low-culture".

In other words, you can't alleged any monkey's doodling on the wall of his Zoo's pen is a definition of "high-culture".

Or put it more bluntly, if you take the example of the Western culture and its canon, you can say, that, the collective works of the German's baroque composer by the name of  J. S. Bach was one version of western's culture and manifestation of its canon (taken in full measure). And on the other hand, rap creatures, like the said "Eminem" of this world, is on the other side scale of the same western culture.

But, still, of course, the two are a day and night to each other. And I know which one of them will stand the "test of time" (and did indeed just that). And will win out in the end of what defines the essence of "Western's high culture", in its totality, and its manifestation of it, in the fullness of time, in so far as the larger Western's civilization and its cultural cannon is concern. 

Similarly, here is example of "high-culture" of the Somali context. And we have in here, our dearest cultural Queen, namely Xamda Queen of the Xiddiga Geeska (i.e., The Horn Stars) much given us with her melodious and sweet voice the nearest we will get to or to the "closest" we will find ourselves to a "true definition of high Somali literature". And for good measure, such arresting literary song is being made as a "love-song" by the ever brilliantly composing hands of Abwaan Laab-Saalax

For in here, the composer if this song, is explaining the depth and the extend in which a woman will go to please her lover. And whilst still capturing the imagination of the listeners with all the yearning, the song must still be "conform" with a modicum of respectability. And should therefore show a touch of "restrained love", as to what the lady who is love have felted.

Hence, that is a mighty "trick to pull it off". Specifically the sense of given a "full meaning" to the person's feelings and the ranges it reaches in one's soul, and yet still never allowing oneself to come across as mere a "cheap harlot", singing after her lover out of her lust for him.

This is the hardest literature to pull, as I said it. Either in love poetry or in Songs. And it's even harden if they have been tried to be commercially successful venture of it at the end of the day, as this particular song was by all measurements. 

So, if your competency in Somali language is good enough, then see to it to listen to "her words" (not the music but the Pregnant words). Whilst at the same time trying to "picture" the words she is speaking in here. For they are words that expressing a deep "womanly love" whilst still conforming to the "modicum of respectability" in which Nomadic cultural setting always expected, particularly as a token of how traditionally respectful their ladies out to be in a social settings.

In similar vein, the other example of "High-Culture" in the Somali context, is another song from the same Xiddiga Geeska. And in particular from Ahmed Aarshe. And he is singing, "ambiguously" and in his unique way to "confirm" the love he has for the woman of his life.

Hence, it's a "Sarbeeb song". And that means its massage is hidden. And here the question is as to what exactly that means, in the sense of asking the question of whether he is singing a love he has for a woman? Or is he singing, patriotically, by saying, that, his love for his land is never to be put asunder by anything else.

And therefore his argument is that, those who are asking for him to forsake his Somaliland for "greater Somalia's political ideology" are doomed to be disappointed. For the love of his life is permanent and forever. And it's for Somaliland alone. Or is he merely singing for a earthly woman in which his love for her is never to be question by anyone else?

It's a genuine the literary acts of "high-cultural beauty" at its best. For this way of doing things allows you to be able to "mesmerize" your listeners, and at the same time, try as they might to "figure-it-out" as to who you are actually addressing in your song, you never did gave them enough of the game away so that they may come away being convinced that they have figure out what your "literary conceit" was all about, already.

Meaning, was this all about a mere woman? A full-bloodied woman. Or perhaps it's an "Idea" in which the singer in here (namely Mr Aarshe) is expressing his undying love for. And the woman in the song is merely "convenient conveyor" of that idea in which he is in love with.

And yet whatever form of manifestation in which that "high-culture" has taken a form of it, must still never leave the "singer's captive listeners" with sure floor under their feet to stand on, particularly, solidly, when it comes for them to know precisely who the song is being addressed to.

Enjoy it, folks. And see to it, to "contrast-and-compare" these  "two examples", one one end, from Somaliland, which in essence tells you the very precise definition of "Somali high-culture" on one hand. And the guttural songs, with no hidden meaning, with no panache of sophistry double-meaning behind it, which to boot, they even have a mere low-farce dance like "Niiko" as their "background coloring", as the first video will show.

Hence, this is precisely as to why Somalis are having an "endless misunderstanding" of what exactly their culture is all about, or ought to be about in-terms of what is their definition of "high-culture", and which is "low-culture" of a farcical kind.

 

Lubiga:- "......Wixii Ku Lura Ayaa Ladh Igu Fura......"

"......Mudaan Lahashada Qalbiga Lingaxoo
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye

Mudaan Lahashada Qalbiga Lingaxoo
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye

Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Lugooyo Axdiga Ka Ladayr Oo
Laabtiisa Ka Beer, Barta Laabtoo, Ka Beer, Ka Beer, Ka Beer

Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Lugooyo Axdiga Ka Ladayr Oo
Laabtiisa Ka Beer, Barta Laabtoo, Ka Beer, Ka Beer, Ka Beer

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan Ladan Tahay Anaa Ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan Ladan Tahay Anaa Ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab

U Laac Caashaqa Sidaan u Lisoo
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintii
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintoo
Haa Weey....

U Laac Caashaqa Sidaan u Lisoo
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintoo
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintoo
Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Hoy Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Kashkaan u Laqimay Inaad Leedee
Kashkaan u Laqimay, Laqimay, Laqimay, Inaad Leedee
Lagayga Ku Jiif Horteed Luxudkoo
Ha laacin Haween Labkaba Ma Arkee
Arkee, Arkee, Arkee

Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Hoy Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Kashkaan u Laqimay, Laqimay, Inaad Leedee
Kashkaan u Laqimay, Laqimay, Laqimay, Inaad Leedee
Lagayga Ku Jiif Horteed Luxudkoo
Ha laacin Haween Labkaba Ma Arkee
Arkee, Arkee, Arkee

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan ladan tahay anaa ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan ladan tahay anaa ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab......"

 

And now is the second example of "High-Culture" of the Somali context. And as I said it, we have in here a singer call, Mr Ahmed Aarshe with his Song:- "Caaashaqu Dan Guud Maaha".

Of course, the "alleged love" (i.e., Caashaq) in which he is expressing his profound believe that it's not something that is of "common or collective interests to all", but it's rather as a "solitary feeling of attachment", raises the question along the line of asking as to whether he is expressing his love for his nation (i.e., Somaliland). And by this he meant it to say that although he bares no ill-will to no man or to no "other ideology", but yet still he is "exclusively" for the attachment to Somaliland alone. And therefore no other larger "collective interests" (i.e. Dan Guud) however laudable they may be such as the political welfare of all Somalis in the form of "Somaliweyn's political ideology" can tear it away that "exclusive attachment" in which he has to Somaliland.

Or is he merely expressing some "middling earthly love a woman of his dream"? And therefore, he is saying, that whether you may wish me ill or good fortune, my loyalty, my love is to this woman, regardless how that may strike your as a "selfish deeds", not in sync with the larger sight of seeing a man compelling himself to put his love for a mere woman far below what his attachment to the general welfare of his community ought to be.

This is the question in which this songs of Mr Aarshe raises profoundly. And this in turn means, in effect, as who is he singing to? 

A mere flesh-and-blood earthly lady? Or is he singing for an attachment he has to an "idea", to a "political concept", to a "nation", to "people of specific geographical territory"? And therefore such thing has been made "akin" to a "blood-and-flesh-woman" of his dream.

This is the beauty of a "high-culture", at least in the Somali context. For it ought to have the elan to carry a "double-meaning". An open case of "double-interpretation". An "ambiguous sense" of never allowing the listeners of getting close to the point of saying, finally, "Aha, we got it". Specifically, in-terms of what actually is the "central thesis" of it as a proposition is all about, whether it be a song or a poem.

And here I rest my case of the precise definition of "High-Culture" in the "Somali context", in which we in Somaliland are actually the pass-masters of it. And indeed are the author of it, particularly in a proportion that is far higher and above of what any other community/region in the Somali peninsula is actually capable of turning it out. 

"......Ahmed Aarshe:- Caashaqu Dan Guud Maaha......"

 

  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oodweyne   
8 hours ago, Dalmar1 said:

So what are you saying, that Hargeisa has higher culture then South Somalia especially Mogadishu?

Take it as a "Cultural Assignment" to be worked on in the mean-time, my friend. And get back to me in next week. I promise I will go easy on you where the "marking-side" of things for you are concern.

Although, it has to be said that back in my teaching days in here of dear old Blighty UK, I was known to be "stickler" who in turn expects a highly argued and well-developed written works from his students.

But since you are (shall we say) a mere lad, learning his way around the "slippery ropes" of "argumentation", in its cohesive construction of it, in its closely-argued synthesis of it, and its sense of teasing out all the possible implications from any written argument, I promise to be a "gentle affair" with you where the marking of your eventual "reasoning work" towards this very question is concern. Okay, my friend,...:P 

  • Haha - That was funny. You made me laugh! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cadnaan1   

This old retarded habeenkina videoyaasha niiko uu Ku siigaystaa maalintana wuu caynayaa

I have never seen this video before and I don't search niiko videos on internet adiga oo 50+ years maxaa niiko u raadinaysaa.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oodweyne   
3 hours ago, cadnaan1 said:

This old retarded habeenkina videoyaasha niiko uu Ku siigaystaa maalintana wuu caynayaa

I have never seen this video before and I don't search niiko videos on internet adiga oo 50+ years maxaa niiko u raadinaysaa.

:DWell, looks like we have in here the latest drivel from our "donkey-legged-looter" of SOL, who simply have run out any chancing place to which to loot. And therefore decided to detained us with whatever his little hair-brain could cobbled together.

No, Lad, this is beyond your ken and comprehension. For it's not what they teach you in that "fly-by-night-looting-dingy-schools" in which the "second generation" of your "communal thieves" from your neck-of-the-wood, like you, gets to be thought their nasty business.

Hence, see to it, to make yourself scarce from here, lad. For in here we dealing with definition of "high culture", in its essence, in its manifestation, in its conceptual frame-work, and finally, in the way it ought to be interpreted. And  to boot, we are doing in all in the "Somali context", alone.

And that means we are actually not dealing in here with a "low-born, low-farce, looting-influenced, and donkeyed-brained culture", in which the looters and the "grand pilferers" of the Somali peninsula, like you lot, are fond of keeping themselves entertained with. Specifically, after they stuffed themselves up to the gully and up to the gullet in most nights with their local dietary of "miserable muufo".:P  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's true  there is no halabur or abwaan wax alifa the koonfurians just rehash  what we tought  them in the60s and 70s.  Waxan dhaqanku wa u dhalasho.. dabolawerejiyo iyo ciyaarbatar ama jaandheerteni laa isma barbardhigi karo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oodweyne   
9 minutes ago, Xaaji Xunjuf said:

dabolawerejiyo iyo ciyaarbatar ama jaandheerteni laa isma barbardhigi karo.

True, that, bro. No wonder since 1991, there hasn't been any genuine cultural effervescent outpouring from the south or from Somalia.

Whereas in Somalilland, the cultural outpouring, in-terms of plays of all sort and of all kind of artistic caliber, in-terms of poetry, in-terms of traditional dances (and the troupes that put on), and in-terms of deeply-cultured-songs with a genuine "Somali Naxwe" behind them, is actually limitless.

Hence, why we are the "light" and they are the "dark", when it comes to the very definition of "Somali High-culture" in its totality and its essence, however much that reality may be a "real pain" to be acknowledged by our former compatriots from the south.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Holac   

If Oodweyne was young partying with strong libido content, which dance would he choose to engage with a punch of Somali girls? Jaandheer or the original Somali-style twerking known as Niiko? Let us say the answer is obvious.  

  • Haha - That was funny. You made me laugh! 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know Oodweyne, you don't have to invoke my name or disparage Somalis in order for you to watch those videos. It's okay to let loose and enjoy the rhythm.

Your high culture in whatever dance form is extremely mechanized moves with no excitement. It's the nature of men to insult what he can't do. So, stop being a hater and get some rhythm in your life.

  • Like 1
  • Haha - That was funny. You made me laugh! 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oodweyne   
8 hours ago, Che -Guevara said:

ou know Oodweyne, you don't have to invoke my name or disparage Somalis in order for you to watch those videos. It's okay to let loose and enjoy the rhythm.

:D:DThat is the spirit, mate, I like a man who gives back the kicks-to-the-groin, as good as he took it. And I actually enjoy that even if I am floored on the ground in pain.

It's the definition of man in my book, particularly in the sense that he must give back as equally if not more so than what he took it on the chin, both at the battlefield and at the metaphorical ones in the debating chambers.

Good on you, mate. For that is a man's man in my book, everything else is breeze of waffle of no consequences.

Perhaps, it's my "geel-jire mentality" that is showing through in here, but I measure man by the "deepness-of-the-cutting-laceration" of his tongue when he is in a "verbal combat" against others. And I also measure man by the "heftiness of his punch" when he is tussling with others.

Not the wealth in his wallet or what "political power" he has under his name. For those are not what makes a man in the true sense of the Somali definition of man. 

*********

 

8 hours ago, Holac said:

If Oodweyne was young partying with strong libido content, which dance would he choose to engage with a punch of Somali girls? Jaandheer or the original Somali-style twerking known as Niiko? Let us say the answer is obvious

 Holac,....:D

 Well, I have you know, that I have actually spend at least a decade or so in Xamar. And I know their culture (like back of my hand) and I could even understand, the local accent of the Xamaraawi guys, particularly, the "gibil-cad" folks.

I was teacher there in Xamar after I have finished Lafole College, And that was before I have decided that living and working in place governed by the likes of Gen. Barre was both bad for the intellectual growth of my mind. And it was bad for my health. So I scuppered out of the country, speedily, and never to be return there, mercifully.

So I know enough about this "sexually-inviting-and arousing-dance" known as "Niiko" (:P). But as you may not know it, my friend, cultures gets to be measured by the elan of its flowering best. And that is the definition of its "high-culture". As much it gets to be viewed dimly (of course) through the lens of its low-culture. Even if all people within that culture ought to be broad-shouldered enough and liberally-minded enough to "tolerate" those who are fond of the sort of low-culture in which that society in question produces.

Hence, for example, London's Royal Opera House (ROH) may stage the collective opera works of the french composer by the name of Georges bizet (say for example). And in particularly, say, the ever captivating work of Carmen Opera, was staged there, which in turn means that if it's staged beautifully and properly, then it will then garner nothing less than a "raving reviews" from all of the respectable media outlets of UK.

And, still, few miles away in the same London, it could be possible for others to staged a "rap musical concert" in which thousands of folks will attend, of course. And it will even be more commercially successful than the "Carmen opera" at the Royal Opera House (ROH), in cash-generating-wise.

Moreover, both of them, namely, the rap music and the Carmen opera, are the same manifestation of the same western's cultures and the canon of their artistic productions, which in turn are respective arts speaking in their own unique tongue and in their own sense of distinct "self-contained" art within the broader western's cultures.

And yet, still, it will not be difficult to tell which is the "high-water-mark of refined culture", and which is the "low culture" within the same continuum of western's cultures and their artistic traditions, regardless of which of them was commercially successful at the end of the day when both of them were staged in the same city of London and even at the same time of the same evening.

This is my argument, my friend. In particularly as to say, that, as much as western's cultures have their own criteria of defining "high-cultures" as opposed to "low cultures" within their same artistic traditions, we the Somalis, on the other hand, have our "own definition and criteria" of what form our "high-cultures", in-terms of poetry, in-terms of traditional plays, and in-terms of literature-laden-songs.

And that definition of "High-Culture" in our "Somali's context" actually start and end with the inquiry of ascertaining as to whether what you have put out as a "cultural output" or as a "artistic productions" can have a "double meaning", or even a triple meaning, when it comes to interpretation of it.

And by this I mean, these criteria sort of inquiries:

Is the meaning of the play or the song, or the poem, "hidden" and therefore can't easily be accessible?

Is it the case that because of the height of the sophistication of the play or the song or the poem, then the very folks who watched the play or listen to song or greedily consumed the poem, will not even agree with each other as to the "real meaning" of what it was they were beholding, indeed?

 And therefore they will leave either the play-theater or will leave "poetry-reading-saloons" (at the end of the night) still arguing, passionately, with each other as to the "meaning", the "interpretation", and the "real comport", of what they saw at the theater or was read to them at the poetry's saloon. 

And they will continue that "heated debate" among themselves long into the weeks, into the months, and even into the years, as some of the poetry works of late Mr Gaariye, and Mr Hadraawi, are liable to have aroused such intense debate to this day. Given that they have created a ferment of heated intellectual discussion within the Somaliland's society about the essence of what their "collective works" were really about.

Consequently, you can say that in any where in the Somali peninsula, whereby such "artistically-refined-ability" of the kind I just described to you is known to be found is actually where the "high culture" of the Somali peninsula can confidently be said to exist on it.

And invariably, for some reason, such places have been known to be Somaliland through out our recorded artistic and cultural history.

And in that sense, don't get me wrong in here, my friend, for I am not knocking down "Niiko" (per se), since I am sure of it that some fine folks (like Che in here, for instance) will like nothing better than to spend the ungodly hours of the night in "ogling" these sort of dances till his eyes are reddishly bulging with sheer lust of it all, particularly for the fine twerking-bottoms of those ladies who are doing the Niiko.:D

But still, all the same, this sort of alleged dances are not a manifestation of "high culture", as much as "Rap Music", however much it moves you or moves anyone else who care to listen to for that matter, is not a definition of "western's high-culture". 

This is the point I am rather trying to get across to you in here, even if I am belaboring a bit of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Che  and holac are  just guys who love street girls low culture hablaha aan lahoyn.  what  do maraykan people call it ebony ride girl I believe in merry old England  It's called hoodrat where Oodweyne is from.   Wa   dhaqanka  aad u hoseeyaa.. booty shaking isn't bad persay for a man to view it. Laakin dhaqan maha twerking as they call it these days dhaqan asluub leh maha.

  • Haha - That was funny. You made me laugh! 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/4/2018 at 8:15 PM, Oodweyne said:

Hello Folks,

Here is a something the likes of Che and others of you who may not know any better should keep in mind. Specifically about the sort of the manifestation in which the very definition of "low-culture", which in turn is despoiling, raping, and indeed, "emptying-of-all-meanings", of the very essence of what "Somali High-Culture" at its "elan of excellence", is, would actually look like it. And in particularly if you put them in plain manifestation as this first video will indicate it to you.

Hence, if you were take as an "example" of the first video below, which is a song with its wretched "Niiko" (no less) that is call "Baydhabo Janaay", you may have a rough idea of what "low-culture" in the Somali context actually look like it.

For what we have in here is basically a vacuous, a merit-less, song. As well as it being a song that is essentially "assaulting-the-sense" as much it says nothing of a sophistication claim for itself, other than having the "baser acts" of two lady twerking their silly bottom-behinds. And doing it so. rhythmically, along with the music of the song. 

 

Moreover, in contrast, here below I give you the definition of "High-culture", expressed in "two literary songs". This manifestation of high culture must at the end of the day be a  highly-refined, at least in the Somali culture we are likely to be talking about in here. And by that I mean the depth of the meaning it's conveying, the seamless-ness of, both, the literal words that are being used to put matters across, and the "mental picture" those very words brings them to live in your mind must be of exceptional high order of things.

Furthermore, a "literary culture" of the kind our oral society actually excel at, is something that is about more than words. Be it poetry or be it songs. For at the heart of it, its what those words invoke in you as a spoken words, as much how they, subsequently, stir the imagination in the sense of "mental picture" those words creates for you. And at juncture, when you reach that state of "imaginative arousal" (in the cultural sense of that word) then you are almost there in-terms of the definition of whether it's "low-culture" or "high-culture" which you have at that precise moment in question in your hands.

Hence, that means the "spoken words" (or if they are not words, then the other cultural medium you are using to convey those cultural artifacts) are actually not meaningless, or should be meaningless. But they are "real force" that gets you to either a "high-culture" or to "low-culture".

In other words, you can't alleged any monkey's doodling on the wall of his Zoo's pen is a definition of "high-culture".

Or put it more bluntly, if you take the example of the Western culture and its canon, you can say, that, the collective works of the German's baroque composer by the name of  J. S. Bach was one version of western's culture and manifestation of its canon (taken in full measure). And on the other hand, rap creatures, like the said "Eminem" of this world, is on the other side scale of the same western culture.

But, still, of course, the two are a day and night to each other. And I know which one of them will stand the "test of time" (and did indeed just that). And will win out in the end of what defines the essence of "Western's high culture", in its totality, and its manifestation of it, in the fullness of time, in so far as the larger Western's civilization and its cultural cannon is concern. 

Similarly, here is example of "high-culture" of the Somali context. And we have in here, our dearest cultural Queen, namely Xamda Queen of the Xiddiga Geeska (i.e., The Horn Stars) much given us with her melodious and sweet voice the nearest we will get to or to the "closest" we will find ourselves to a "true definition of high Somali literature". And for good measure, such arresting literary song is being made as a "love-song" by the ever brilliantly composing hands of Abwaan Laab-Saalax

For in here, the composer if this song, is explaining the depth and the extend in which a woman will go to please her lover. And whilst still capturing the imagination of the listeners with all the yearning, the song must still be "conform" with a modicum of respectability. And should therefore show a touch of "restrained love", as to what the lady who is love have felted.

Hence, that is a mighty "trick to pull it off". Specifically the sense of given a "full meaning" to the person's feelings and the ranges it reaches in one's soul, and yet still never allowing oneself to come across as mere a "cheap harlot", singing after her lover out of her lust for him.

This is the hardest literature to pull, as I said it. Either in love poetry or in Songs. And it's even harden if they have been tried to be commercially successful venture of it at the end of the day, as this particular song was by all measurements. 

So, if your competency in Somali language is good enough, then see to it to listen to "her words" (not the music but the Pregnant words). Whilst at the same time trying to "picture" the words she is speaking in here. For they are words that expressing a deep "womanly love" whilst still conforming to the "modicum of respectability" in which Nomadic cultural setting always expected, particularly as a token of how traditionally respectful their ladies out to be in a social settings.

In similar vein, the other example of "High-Culture" in the Somali context, is another song from the same Xiddiga Geeska. And in particular from Ahmed Aarshe. And he is singing, "ambiguously" and in his unique way to "confirm" the love he has for the woman of his life.

Hence, it's a "Sarbeeb song". And that means its massage is hidden. And here the question is as to what exactly that means, in the sense of asking the question of whether he is singing a love he has for a woman? Or is he singing, patriotically, by saying, that, his love for his land is never to be put asunder by anything else.

And therefore his argument is that, those who are asking for him to forsake his Somaliland for "greater Somalia's political ideology" are doomed to be disappointed. For the love of his life is permanent and forever. And it's for Somaliland alone. Or is he merely singing for a earthly woman in which his love for her is never to be question by anyone else?

It's a genuine the literary acts of "high-cultural beauty" at its best. For this way of doing things allows you to be able to "mesmerize" your listeners, and at the same time, try as they might to "figure-it-out" as to who you are actually addressing in your song, you never did gave them enough of the game away so that they may come away being convinced that they have figure out what your "literary conceit" was all about, already.

Meaning, was this all about a mere woman? A full-bloodied woman. Or perhaps it's an "Idea" in which the singer in here (namely Mr Aarshe) is expressing his undying love for. And the woman in the song is merely "convenient conveyor" of that idea in which he is in love with.

And yet whatever form of manifestation in which that "high-culture" has taken a form of it, must still never leave the "singer's captive listeners" with sure floor under their feet to stand on, particularly, solidly, when it comes for them to know precisely who the song is being addressed to.

Enjoy it, folks. And see to it, to "contrast-and-compare" these  "two examples", one one end, from Somaliland, which in essence tells you the very precise definition of "Somali high-culture" on one hand. And the guttural songs, with no hidden meaning, with no panache of sophistry double-meaning behind it, which to boot, they even have a mere low-farce dance like "Niiko" as their "background coloring", as the first video will show.

Hence, this is precisely as to why Somalis are having an "endless misunderstanding" of what exactly their culture is all about, or ought to be about in-terms of what is their definition of "high-culture", and which is "low-culture" of a farcical kind.

 

Lubiga:- "......Wixii Ku Lura Ayaa Ladh Igu Fura......"

"......Mudaan Lahashada Qalbiga Lingaxoo
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye

Mudaan Lahashada Qalbiga Lingaxoo
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye
Jacaylka Ku Laalay Loolisaye

Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Lugooyo Axdiga Ka Ladayr Oo
Laabtiisa Ka Beer, Barta Laabtoo, Ka Beer, Ka Beer, Ka Beer

Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Hadaan Kugu Ladhay Xiskaad Ku Lignayd
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Wakaa i Luree, Luree, Luree, Dartaa i Lushee
Lugooyo Axdiga Ka Ladayr Oo
Laabtiisa Ka Beer, Barta Laabtoo, Ka Beer, Ka Beer, Ka Beer

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan Ladan Tahay Anaa Ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan Ladan Tahay Anaa Ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka Lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, Kusii Laban-laab

U Laac Caashaqa Sidaan u Lisoo
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintii
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintoo
Haa Weey....

U Laac Caashaqa Sidaan u Lisoo
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintoo
Leel-leelka Kadaa Danta iyo Libintoo
Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Hoy Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Kashkaan u Laqimay Inaad Leedee
Kashkaan u Laqimay, Laqimay, Laqimay, Inaad Leedee
Lagayga Ku Jiif Horteed Luxudkoo
Ha laacin Haween Labkaba Ma Arkee
Arkee, Arkee, Arkee

Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Hoy Labaynu Nahee Lilaahi ii Ahoow
Kashkaan u Laqimay, Laqimay, Inaad Leedee
Kashkaan u Laqimay, Laqimay, Laqimay, Inaad Leedee
Lagayga Ku Jiif Horteed Luxudkoo
Ha laacin Haween Labkaba Ma Arkee
Arkee, Arkee, Arkee

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan ladan tahay anaa ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab

Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Oo
Wixii Ku Luraa Ladh Igu Fura Ooway
Hadaan ladan tahay anaa ladayee
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab
Hoy Jacaylka lubiga, Lubiga, Lubiga, kusii Laban-laab......"

 

And now is the second example of "High-Culture" of the Somali context. And as I said it, we have in here a singer call, Mr Ahmed Aarshe with his Song:- "Caaashaqu Dan Guud Maaha".

Of course, the "alleged love" (i.e., Caashaq) in which he is expressing his profound believe that it's not something that is of "common or collective interests to all", but it's rather as a "solitary feeling of attachment", raises the question along the line of asking as to whether he is expressing his love for his nation (i.e., Somaliland). And by this he meant it to say that although he bares no ill-will to no man or to no "other ideology", but yet still he is "exclusively" for the attachment to Somaliland alone. And therefore no other larger "collective interests" (i.e. Dan Guud) however laudable they may be such as the political welfare of all Somalis in the form of "Somaliweyn's political ideology" can tear it away that "exclusive attachment" in which he has to Somaliland.

Or is he merely expressing some "middling earthly love a woman of his dream"? And therefore, he is saying, that whether you may wish me ill or good fortune, my loyalty, my love is to this woman, regardless how that may strike your as a "selfish deeds", not in sync with the larger sight of seeing a man compelling himself to put his love for a mere woman far below what his attachment to the general welfare of his community ought to be.

This is the question in which this songs of Mr Aarshe raises profoundly. And this in turn means, in effect, as who is he singing to? 

A mere flesh-and-blood earthly lady? Or is he singing for an attachment he has to an "idea", to a "political concept", to a "nation", to "people of specific geographical territory"? And therefore such thing has been made "akin" to a "blood-and-flesh-woman" of his dream.

This is the beauty of a "high-culture", at least in the Somali context. For it ought to have the elan to carry a "double-meaning". An open case of "double-interpretation". An "ambiguous sense" of never allowing the listeners of getting close to the point of saying, finally, "Aha, we got it". Specifically, in-terms of what actually is the "central thesis" of it as a proposition is all about, whether it be a song or a poem.

And here I rest my case of the precise definition of "High-Culture" in the "Somali context", in which we in Somaliland are actually the pass-masters of it. And indeed are the author of it, particularly in a proportion that is far higher and above of what any other community/region in the Somali peninsula is actually capable of turning it out. 

"......Ahmed Aarshe:- Caashaqu Dan Guud Maaha......"

 

  

This is dope bro! thanks for sharing this idea. America and the western cultural has different strong influence not somalia/somalis but the world as a whole. You are absolutely right about Somalis taking the ratchet part of the culture ex Nikko and making it basically Somali culture....Somali culture is more than just nikko and dhanto but this is what the westerners want to see and some somali are seeking fame...and to get this fame if they are told to jump they will say how high lol.... they love to show off and perform. we call these people sellouts. 

i live in the west and it feels like they will never truly accept you unless you take their culture and mix a little bit of your culture. they also want immigrants and blacks(african american) to be busy dancing ex shaking, twerking, and nikko....this is their fantasies than slowing they will influence the next generation to become models than stripper and down the dark road. may Allah swt protect us and our families. But like i was say this is exactly how they destoryed many culture for example african america culture is now nothing but twerking and ratchet dances smh. who Y'all think created this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.