Reeyo

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Everything posted by Reeyo

  1. Lol Apophis thanks for the information. I'll ring saliga Hargisa and get a warning out on him.
  2. I am glade its being talked about as well. I've always wore my hijab but I have had comments. I've always given my colleagues the opportunity to ask me questions about my hijab and my prayer. Once I explained it it became normal for them. I have a really good Nigerian friend who changed his name to get employed because he honestly felt because of his ethic name he wasn't getting interviews. In the end he started his own business.
  3. Reeyo

    Knock Knock

    Thanks Blue, Apophis, I am not a fan, I was into Sliders rather and Star Trek. Aaah TV has never been the same. lol
  4. SubhanAllah. Horta is security so poor in America that people must own guns? I honestly don't understand this aspect of the American culture, why is self-defense so important that a teenager can grab a automatic weapon anywhere and go on shooting spree?
  5. Well uninformed or not there you have it mate. Be careful your showing the signs of a potential '........' Did you know these maids are mostly reer baadiyo girls?
  6. Reeyo

    Knock Knock

    Apophis;898836 wrote: I wish I made it up: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apophis_(Stargate)#Apophis http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/99942_Apophis Stargate? Brilliant lol Thanks for the welcomes Somalia, Taleexi and Chim
  7. Haha, tragic indeed. I found the whole maid situation in Somalia creepy, especially young naive girls working for men alone...I can see certain issues on the rise.
  8. Reeyo

    Knock Knock

    Apophis-A dream? You mean you made it up to sound smart? Oba-Script? Thanks Nariah walal, feeling the love
  9. Reeyo

    What to do?

    Narniah;898524 wrote: A few weeks ago I told my cousin (male) from my dads side about the Somali guy at my work. He warned me to stay away from him as back home that guys tribe and our tribe are staunch enemies and kill one another and that this guy probably has killed many of my people. The Somali guy at my work once asked me my tribe and when I said I'm Somali isn't that enuff he insisted I tell him weeks on and then finally I told him whereupon he couldn't believe me and kept saying 'Say walahi'? I dunno what to make of it. Might be a lil irrelevant but just adding on so you guys get where I'm coming from. Haha!! Romeo and Juliet Somali style eh? Your lucky hun, I wish I had a Somali working with me I think we'd rule the place - Get the guy on your side and have some fun! We Somalis got to stick together.
  10. Reeyo

    Knock Knock

    Narniah;898815 wrote: You remembered to log in almost 6 years later? Welcome:) Haha, believe it or not I was cleaning out my emails and found I was a member here so I'd thought I'd check out the place and remember why I joined.... But so far I like so I'll be sticking around Thanks Apophis ( what the hell is that?)
  11. Reeyo

    1 in 5

    I was reading this in some shitty paper on the train the other day and I found it absurd considering the percentage of the Muslim population on the little Isles. 1 in 5? ---------- 1 in 5 young men in prison is a Muslim, research shows (Picture: PA) More than one in five young men in prison are Muslims, who claim to feel safer and more respected than other inmates, research shows. They account for 22 per cent of prisoners in youth jails in England and Wales compared with 18 per cent Church of England and 17 per cent Catholic. The inmates felt their religious beliefs were also more likely to be respected but black and other ethnic minorities felt less safe and likely to be victimised, the chief inspector of prisons found. Some Muslim prisoners felt more victimised by staff, with more than two in five having been physically restrained while serving time, compared with about one in three non-Muslims. The number of children and young people in custody fell by 14 per cent in 2011-2012, from 1,822 to 1,543. However, there was a rise in the number of youth prisoners previously in care. Prison inspectors condemned the ‘depressingly high’ proportion of young offenders who spent time being looked after by local authorities. Concerns were also raised about a surge in the number of those who felt unsafe in young offender institutions. Campaigners called for the institutions to be overhauled. ‘Herding together high numbers of challenging and often vulnerable young men into large, bleak, under-staffed institutions inevitably leads to violence and self-harm,’ said the Prison Reform Trust’s Juliet Lyon. ‘Fewer young people in custody means fewer blighted lives and less reoffending.’ Frances Done, who chairs the Youth Justice Board, vowed to review the findings, adding safety and welfare of child prisoners ‘is our highest priority’.
  12. Reeyo

    Knock Knock

    Hoo'y haablo, ii warena...dhaxa baa jirta ee show some warmth and hellos...
  13. Wadani;898014 wrote: Though i do think that an appreciative smirk was probably missing from our faces while we were living our lives in the past, I don't think it can always be attributed to the all too human tendency to romantisicze past experiences. It may be due to the simple fact that we don't appreciate the good we have until it's gone. As life goes on it often becomes more complicated, mundane and our choices have bigger and more serious consequences, and it's in those moments where we come face to face with lifes toils that we reminisce and become nostalgic for a time when things were objectively much simpler, and happiness, however fleeting, less elusive. I agree, most of us live in the past alot more then the present and we appreciate the good when it's gone. I always get that silly happy feeling when I remember certain times with friends and places that I didn't really think much off at the time. Being nostalgic cannot possibly be objective, it is always personal and only makes sense to you why that memory makes you feel a certain way.